• Late Art Deco Sterling Painted Porcelain "Four Vices" Cufflinks
  • Late Art Deco Sterling Painted Porcelain "Four Vices" Cufflinks
  • Late Art Deco Sterling Painted Porcelain "Four Vices" Cufflinks
  • Late Art Deco Sterling Painted Porcelain "Four Vices" Cufflinks
  • Late Art Deco Sterling Painted Porcelain "Four Vices" Cufflinks
  • Late Art Deco Sterling Painted Porcelain "Four Vices" Cufflinks
  • Late Art Deco Sterling Painted Porcelain "Four Vices" Cufflinks

Late Art Deco Sterling Painted Porcelain "Four Vices" Cufflinks

SKU: 42996

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A unique and whimsical pair of porcelain cufflinks from the late Art Deco (ca1930) era! Crafted in sterling silver, these double-sided cufflinks each display an image depicting the now antiquated term "four vices of men," which include: gambling, women, drinking, and sport. Each oval-shaped link features a porcelain plaque with a hand-painted illustration that comes alive in wonderful color. One set of images features a trio of playing cards against a vibrant yellow background and jockey atop a horse in mid-stride to represent the vices of gambling and sport betting. The other set includes a "can can" dancer on a bright green stage and a bottle of alcohol with two champagne glasses against the same vibrant yellow background to represent the vices of drinking alcohol and seeking women. The plaques rest in a bezel setting and a short curb link chain on the back connects each link together, one which is stamped with a "925" silver purity mark. An unusual and whimsical pair, these cufflinks would look equally stylish worn by a man or woman!

Measurements: Each cufflink measures slightly less than 3/4" tall, a little bit less than 1/2" wide, and is 1/8" thick. The curb link chains at the back measure about 3/4" long. 

Condition: The overall condition of the cufflinks is excellent. Besides normal surface wear, there is no apparent damage to the sterling setting. The curb link chain backings are secure and in good working condition. The hand painted porcelain plaques do not appear to have any cracks or chips, which is remarkable given their age. There is a slight darkened patina on some of the sterling, which is common given the age of the piece and adds to its unique beauty.